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The Facinating Sewing Machine!

It amazed me that once in history there were no sweing machines. Can you image how long it took Caroline Ingalls to sew a dress for Half-pint? I mean really, it would take forever and come on now, how long would the thing last anyhow??? So I did a little surfing to get the facinating facts about the good ol' sewing machine.

AT A GLANCE:In the early 1800s, clothing was made by hand, families sewed their pants, shirts, and dresses using a needle and thread. But in 1846 Elias Howe changed all that, he came up with another way to make clothes, he patented the first practical sewing machine..The sewing machine industry based on his original invention made possible the mass production of clothing on a much larger scale than had ever been possible with hand-stitching.


Invention : sewing machine
Function: noun / sew·ing ma·chine
Definition: A apparatus using a needle and thread to join or repair material. Primarily used in the making of clothing.
Patent: 4,750 (US) issued September 10, 1846
Inventor: Elias Howe
Criteria; First practical. Entrepreneur.
Birth: July 10, 1819 in Spencer, Massachusetts
Death: October 3, 1867 in Brooklyn, New York
Nationality: American



Milestones:

1755 Charles T. Wiesenthal, designed and patented a double pointed needle

1826 On March 10, Henry Lye received a patent for a device for sewing leather

1830 Barthelemy Thimonnier used a wheel-driven connecting rod that drove the needle up and down

1834 Walter Hunt designed a double-thread shuttle machine

1846 Elias Howe invented and patented the first Automatic Sewing Machine for practical operation.

1849 Benjamin Wilson introduced an automatic feeding system.

1851 Isaac Merritt Singer Invented introduced the first sewing machine scaled for home use.

1854 Isaac Singer patent (US No.10975) issued May 30, for the home sewing machine

1854 Allen Wilson had developed an improved reciprocating

1855 Wilson went into business with Nathaniel Wheeler to produce a rotary hook instead of a shuttle

1856 Patent Combine formed, consisting of Singer, Howe, Wheeler & Wilson, and Grover & Baker.

1889 The first practical electric sewing machine introduced by the Singer Sewing Machine Co.

1900 Singer claims 80% worldwide market share in sewing machines




Have you ever wondered how the sewing maching actually works? Well I found this little animation and I was like, "WOW!" Isn't this the coolest thing. I'm so glad God gave man the mind to come up with something like this.


Thought I would share a picture of my Singer Ingenuity. I was save for a Viking but it was going to take me a few years to get enough :0) so I settled for a Singer. I have to say I love this thing. It's great and sew easy to use. LOVE IT!!!

12 comments:

  1. That was a great post! I learned something lol

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  2. How interesting! Thanks for doing all the research on one of my favorite tools. It's funny...when I read old books and think about how they made everything by hand, it makes me wish I was there. But I know that if those people could have looked into the future and see the conveniences we have today, they would love to have our technology. When I get really sappy and sit down to actually DO some hand sewing....I start to see things their way! Boy I'm glad for my machine!!

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  3. I know, I think of how little I get done on my machine now, there were so much better on what they didn't have then we are with all our conveniences.

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  4. That was such a cool graphic on how a sewing machine works....I never knew....and your machine looks great...does it do embroidery..I am looking to buy a new machine next year...and also would love the feature that makes the needle stay in the down position automatically when you stop sewing....don't want to spend tooooo much..any advice of where to start would be welcome.
    Deby

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  5. Oh, that was so neat--all the info and the demonstration of how the sewing machine works. I was mesmerized by it! =)

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  6. wow, My kids would never have clothes if I had to hand sew them! I rarely bring my sewing machine out as it is... shame on me!

    what an interesting post, thanks for sharing Tori!

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  7. I loved that animation - fascinating! Thank you for finding all of that information and for sharing it.

    My sewing machine is really old and has been getting on my nerves. I had decided to go ahead and buy this really nice new one that was on an incredible sale, but then I decided that I still shouldn't spend the money. I don't sew that much anyway, but maybe I would if I had a nice machine. :)

    Actually, cutting the fabric out seems like the scariest part. :)

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  8. Thank you for the sewing machine lesson. :) Now, women were doing pretty much all the sewing in those days, but did you notice that the men were the ones making the inventions and improvements? Isn't that funny?

    I like your sewing machine...very cute!

    ~Kristi

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  9. Wow, very very cool! I am the owner of about a half dozen sewing machines of varying vintages and I never knew exactly how they worked. Your blog is sooo...educational;-)

    and I see that you are a missionary family? Our family would love to add yours to our prayer map if that would be agreeable to you, of course!

    Thanks for visiting my blog and thanks for your gracious comment,
    Diane

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  10. Tori that was very interesting. I learned to sew on a treddle machine. I have an old one now but it does not work, if it did I would still use it.lol I am slow to learn new things unless I see someone use them. I may get another one soon though, you have convinced me that your is easy to use. I love singer sewing machines. Have a good week. connie from Texas

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  11. I wandered over here from Missionary Mom's blog. As a fellow missionary I love finding other missionary blogs! I will be visiting often!
    fortheloveofmissions.blogspot.com

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  12. Dear Tori, I left you a message on your other blog and I sure hope that you get it. love you, connie from Texas

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Hey thanks in advance for leaving a comment, sure do appreciate it!!

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